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Gas Prices: Waiting For The Sell-off

Further price drops may occur in coming days as gas stations’ expensive inventory runs dry.

The average price of a gallon of self-serve regular gasoline in the Inland Empire dropped 1.2 cents today to $4.618, the eighth consecutive decline following a six-day streak of increases, but the cost to fuel up remains high.

The average price in Riverside and San Bernardino counties has dropped 7 cents over the past eight days, including nine-tenths of a cent on Monday, after rising 52.4 cents over the previous six days to a record high of $4.688, according to figures from the AAA and Oil Price Information Service.

The average price is 6.9 cents less than one week ago, but 48.8 cents more than one month ago and 78 cents higher than one year ago.

"Gas prices are definitely not coming down with the same ferocity that they went up," Marie Montgomery Nordhues of the Automobile Club of Southern California said. "In fact, they haven't even yet dropped below the previous all-time record prices we saw in 2008. Some significant declines are expected and we don't know why they haven't happened yet."

But further price drops may occur in coming days as gas stations’ expensive inventory runs dry.

“We hope to see some significant price drops …, but they will only come after gas stations are able to sell off the expensive fuel …,” Auto Club spokesperson Jeffrey Spring said.

before the previously scheduled Oct. 31 sales date, an action the governor said would increase gas supplies up to 8-10 percent.

The move was prompted by spiking gas prices that the governor said were threatening "significant economic disruption, and serious harm to public safety and welfare."

California's wholesale gasoline market may have gone into a "panic" over fuel supplies. Spring said the rising prices followed a power failure at the ExxonMobil Torrance Refinery and closure of a Chevron pipeline that moves crude oil to Northern California early this month.

Other pressure on the state's gas market includes local refineries
dropping production levels, energy companies exporting fuel to Mexico and other countries, and allowing inventory to dwindle in anticipation of switching over to production of winter blend gasoline, Spring said.

--City News Service and Toni McAllister contributed to this report.

  
Bubba October 17, 2012 at 12:17 AM
We pay higher prices on the cheaper inventory in the tanks at the start of these types of sudden gas price increases. The same applies to crude oil, even though the oil is paid for and in transit, we pay the speculative prices. So they can keep waiting as far as I am concerned. If everyone would stop filling up their tanks and use a fixed dollar amount to nearly fill their tanks, the gasoline companies would not be able to squeeze us so easily. Pick a budget amount and stick with it. You all know what it takes to fill your gas tank. Then when prices rise, you are still paying the same dollar amount at the pump. Sure you can't go as far on tank of gas, but it is not that much difference to us. The gasoline companies on the other hand would be left with inventory increases. Additionally , their projected cash flow increases would be deficient an nearly non existent.
Diana October 17, 2012 at 12:25 AM
Funny we were in Nevada and AZ this weekend, all of their gas prices were under $4.00.
Mozzie October 17, 2012 at 12:38 AM
So if I only put $20 in my tank each time... then the other people will be using up the expensive stuff in the storage tank. Because not everybody is going to stop filling up their tank. I've just been avoiding the gas stations. And I did use up that cheap stuff I had sitting around for the lawn mower. What I don't get is why there is such a line when they announce a shortage of gas. I'm sure all those people didn't need gas at the same time. I think it's a panic thing.
Misterschmidty October 17, 2012 at 12:55 AM
If you don't think it isn't a fixed market think again. The high price is due to California refinery problems, but think about that. Refineries couldn't keep up with demand because of refinery problems that impact only gasoline. Why did diesel take the same big jump eventhough it is not coming out of the crippled gasoline refinery. Try to explain that one.
Jessica October 17, 2012 at 03:04 PM
all the taxes that CA adds is the reason why the rest of the country pays less. Play the FB game. Ask all your friends to post what they are paying in their areas. You'd be surprised at how far, or NOT far, our money goes by living here. After all, everyone in CA is a rich and can afford to pay more right?
Net October 17, 2012 at 10:14 PM
Big oil= big sham, collusion, market manipulators, and price gouging. They say its supply and demand; but why are we paying for their errors. They have a spill, the price goes up. Their equipment fails, the price goes up. QE3 floods the market, the price goes up. Such a bunch of BS everybody.

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