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Sheriff To Increase Patrols In Lakeland Village, Other Unincorporated Areas

"The new deputies will allow the Sheriff's Department to bring these patrol strength levels back to 1.0 deputies/1,000 population," said sheriff's spokesperson Deputy Albert Martinez.

The number of sheriff's deputies patrolling unincorporated areas such as Lakeland Village other parts of Riverside County is set to increase soon thanks to a freshly-graduated group.

Following completion of six months of basic training, 23 graduates walked in a ceremony held Thursday in Riverside, it was announced. The graduates are the first in a replacement stream to rebuild staffing after 2011 cutbacks in unincorporated areas, according to a news release. Some of the new deputies will also be assigned to local jails.

Riverside County Sheriff Stan Sniff sought and was given approval in June 2012 by the Board of Supervisors to deficit-spend to begin hiring in an effort to restore previous staffing levels.

During the prior year, positions vacated by attrition were not filled, resulting in a decrease of deputies assigned to unincorporated communities such as Murrieta Hot Springs, French Valley, Winchester, Aguanga and Anza Valley.

"The new deputies will allow the Sheriff's Department to bring these patrol strength levels back to 1.0 deputies/1,000 population," said sheriff's spokesperson Deputy Albert Martinez.

"In the previous fiscal year, the Board of Supervisors directed the reduction to .75/1,000 for budget purposes. In addition, as a result of AB 109 Realignment, the Sheriff is expanding jail staffing to deal with the added burdens shifted to the counties by the state in October 2011."

Additional academy classes are underway and will continue in successive waves, as will continuous hiring by the department, Martinez said.

"The Sheriff told the Board of Supervisors in June 2012 that he needed a decision that month to have the unincorporated patrol force beefed up by mid-2014 due to the long lead times in recruiting, testing, background investigations, and training of new deputies in accordance with state POST standards. The Sheriff's budget will be readjusted later this fiscal year by the CEO to accommodate the directed hiring increase."

The Basic Academy is offered at the Ben Clark Training Center and satisfies the minimum requirements established by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, according to the news release.

The Moreno Valley College, Riverside Community College District, provides college credits for these classes in partnership with BCTC. BCTC conducts these training courses throughout the year in Riverside under certification by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department through POST.

Roberto January 21, 2013 at 05:38 PM
A little late. How about some community based policing and a citizens review board? Illegal aliens? How about moving the meth heads into TREATMENT, Homeless off the street, panhandlers set to group homes, parolies back to their communities, removing blighted structures within one year and holding giverment accountable for taxes vs. value received?
One Voice January 21, 2013 at 05:41 PM
I wondered why I saw three cop cars on Grand this morning on my way to work. They really need police presence on this road, it is not a freeway although most drivers think it is, very, very unsafe especially during peak traffic hours and when the kids are going to school and getting out. Why would anyone build schools on such busy unattended roads? While your at it please patrol Machado from Grand to Lincoln, it's a race track.
Jenny Nason January 21, 2013 at 06:01 PM
David A Brown needs to be attended to on school mornings as well.
Reverend Smith January 21, 2013 at 06:28 PM
Agreed about Machado, Grand and Lincoln being used as drag strips. I heard from someone who lives at the north end of Lincoln a few yeas back about a neighbor there who got sick of punks racing up and down Lincoln. He stood in front of one of their cars that he had backed up against the end of the road. The car had nowhere else to go but through the neighbor who was waiting for police to arrive. The kid in the car drove over the neighbor, killing him. As far as Grand, there's been at least one death of a student waiting for a ride across from the now closed Butterfield Elementary School. And someone who lives on Grand near there told me he saw some guy so drunk he could hardly hold his head up showing up driving a car TO PICK UP HIS KID FROM SCHOOL. That was right where the kid was run down just a few years earlier.
Ken Mayes January 21, 2013 at 10:33 PM
Rather than spending more money on police officer's, money would be better spent on providing the tools and resources for and effective neighborhood watch program, you can never hire enough police. San Diego Sheriff Department uses a mapping system that gives information of all calls up to the previous day that is simple to use, whereas Riverside gives only limited information that is as much as a week old. There also needs to be a contact person at the sheriff's department for each community much like the old Community Oriented Police (COP) program, you have to have someone that knows the area.
Debbie is a Hypocrite January 22, 2013 at 02:47 AM
I am dumber than dirt, but then I'm a liberal
Reverend Smith January 22, 2013 at 07:08 AM
That's a pretty informative article. Everyone should read it.

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