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Anti-Bullying Laws Take Effect July 1

July 1 brings in a slew of new laws for California residents; two anti-bullying laws are among the many to hit the books.

Several new laws took effect July 1 in California and will affect local residents as well. Here are a few of which Patch thought you'd want to be aware.

AB 9, authored by Tom Ammiano (D-San Francisco), requires schools to implement bullying complaint procedures and alternative discipline policies for bullying.

AB 69, authored by Jim Beall (D-San Jose), grants counties access to the Social Security Administration to determine seniors who are eligible to receive food stamps.

AB 300, authored by Fiona Ma (D-San Francisco), imposes minimum standards for sterilizing, sanitizing and maintaining safety at body piercing, tattoo and permanent cosmetic businesses.

AB 341, authored by Wes Chesbro (D-Arcata), requires recycling for businesses and apartment buildings of more than four units that have more than four cubic yards of waste per week.

AB 959, authored by Brian Jones (R-Santee), allows welfare and food stamp recipients an extra month to file quarterly reports.

AB 1156, authored by Mike Eng (D-Monterey Park), revises the definition of bullying, gives bullied victims priority for transferring schools and requires bullying-prevention training.

AB 1215, authored by Bob Blumenfield (D-Woodland Hills), mandates used vehicle dealers to participate in a program for flagging salvaged vehicles and junk as well as raises the maximum document-processing fee for vehicles.

AB 1424, authored by Henry Perea (D-Fresno), mandates that the state suspend licenses from the state’s highest tax delinquents.

SB 190, authored by Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach), changes the enforcement of mechanics liens and requires a person to forfeit his lien if he includes labor or materials in a claim that were not furnished to the property in the claim.

SB 222, authored by Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa) and Elaine Alquist (D-Santa Clara), ensures that all women receive maternity coverage regardless of their health insurance policies.

SB 424, authored by Michael Rubio (D-Bakersfield), authorizes a design professional to convert a lien assuming that certain requirements are satisfied.

SB 510, authored by Lou Correa (D-Santa Ana), authorizes a broker to appoint a manager of a branch office and delegate supervising responsibility to him.

SB 841, authored by Lois Wolk (D-Davis), imposes indemnity obligations on local agencies that fail to obtain approval. --Jennifer van der Kleut


Andria July 02, 2012 at 03:08 PM
Wow, looks like they've been busy passing lots of laws motivated by personal agendas. Maybe they can get to work on the economy and job creation instead??
Anon July 02, 2012 at 04:17 PM
AB 959, authored by Brian Jones (R-Santee), allows welfare and food stamp recipients an extra month to file quarterly reports. They usually do not even work, so why do they need extra time?
Anon July 02, 2012 at 04:20 PM
AB 69, authored by Jim Beall (D-San Jose), grants counties access to the Social Security Administration to determine seniors who are eligible to receive food stamps the seniors should already get them, its the illegals who shouldnt! I see illegals in the store buying stuff for a party with their EBT card. It kills me! They are using us!
Heidi Golgart-Hastings Ward July 02, 2012 at 04:56 PM
Oh well that is good. So if you cannot afford to pay your taxes, lets take your license away so then you cannot get to work and then really cannot afford anything!
Anon July 02, 2012 at 06:59 PM
I saw that! Lame idea!
Wizard Without Remorse July 03, 2012 at 09:48 AM
Did you demand to see their immigration documentation? The County of Riverside has very strong rules requiring original (no copies) documents granting citizenship (ie: embossed birth certificate, US passport, naturalization documents and a few more uncommon forms). If you truly have the ability to determine citizen ship by staring at someone's back then you have a great future with the Department of Homeland Security.
Martha L. Bridges July 03, 2012 at 03:20 PM
Looks to me like all these new laws address some shortcomings and provide improvement over what we had on the books. This is especially true with regard to those about bullying which has become so common and destructive in our society. Recovering from the economic recession is a complex matter and will probably take years in our areas. Job creation is a catchy political phrase, but what should be obvious is that no one person or entity can just create jobs. Jobs are created by growing demands for products and services, and as yet we don't have much of those demands in our community. Let's hope that the jobs and infrastructure bills recently passed by congress are swiftly implemented. We need the infrastructure improvements which are sorely needed, and the jobs would be a great help. The passage of the bills should have occured months ago.
Martha L. Bridges July 03, 2012 at 03:27 PM
Here we go again with the baseless generalizations and negative assumptions that you seem determined to interject into every article. You are just sure that people who are getting food stamps are not working? How can you possibly know that is true? There are plenty of working poor in this country who need temporary assistance to get through this difficult time, and many of them do need a little more time to get their paperwork completed. Let's stop assuming the worst of everyone!
Wildomar Resident July 03, 2012 at 04:51 PM
I agree with Martha, in that some of these laws were necessary to clean up existing statutes. HOWEVER…. Despite what Martha says, job creation does not materialize by demand alone. Job creation comes from the small business entrepreneur, who takes a chance, invests his life savings, and puts in long hours, with the hope that he will be a success. Why take these risks? The answer is simple -They believe they have a shot at winning. In cities where local politicians foster good relationships with the business community and provide reasons for wanting to set up shop and stay there, small business takes root and grows. In cities where the local politicians show distain for the business community and place road blocks in the way of development, small business never takes root. Martha says we don’t have the same demands for products and services. I beg to differ. The residents of Wildomar have the same shopping lists as the residents of other nearby cities. I simply have to take my shopping list to stores in neighboring communities and they benefit from the tax dollars that come in. Our politicians should prioritize their efforts. If Wildomar is to survive as a city, we need to establish a revenue plan, based on sales tax revenues, not from the pockets of those living here. Give me an alternative to shopping in Murrieta, Temecula or Lake Elsinore. Show the entrepreneurs they will be rewarded for their risks, not penalized!

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